Healthy Pets and People Seminar Recap

Dr. Ruth mentioning the benefits of reading magazines like Lowcountry Dog magazine

Dr. Ruth mentioning the benefits of reading magazines like Lowcountry Dog magazine

 

We were fortunate to get this play by play from Renata Dos Santos of the Healthy Pets and People Seminar held two weekends ago at Sun Dog Cat Moon. Sounds like it was a fantastic and informative seminar. It’s wonderful to have experts in the field of holistic care here in Charleston. Here’s some food for thought {and photos} from the seminar. Make sure to check out the recipe  for home-made pet food at the end!

Diane Samsel introduced us to Animal Communication. She reminded the group that we are all born with psychic ability and intuition. We filter these skills out as we get older and learn the “norm”. Diane discussed the importance of diet for both humans and animals. In that a healthy body fosters a healthy mind and spirit. She believes in feeding well balanced diets free of chemicals, sugar, additives and excessive carbs from too many grains to animals. Diane noted that animals are sentient beings, which means they are conscious of their surroundings, feelings and thoughts. Animals are also very excited when they come across someone who understands and listens to them. The basic technique for learning communication with animals is firstly to center yourself. Then acknowledge the animal either verbally or mentally. Then communicate with the animal. There are four modes of communication: Auditory (hearing the conversation), Visual (seeing pictures or movies describing the situation or event), Kinesthetic or Empathic ( feeling in your body what’s happening to another’s body; especially emotions, pain, physical and mental states) and Knowing (that is without knowing how you know, you just know). Most communicators are strong in one of these modes of communication but will rely on all of them. Finally say “Thank You”. Diane reminded us to always acknowledge and show gratitude for the gift given to you by your animal companion. She then took us through a series of exercises to practice our skills. Our first exercise was to pair off and take turns thinking of a specific primary color. The partner had to then say which color it was based on their intuition. Everyone in the group got the correct color on their first try. Our second exercise was to think of a shape. Our final exercise was to communicate with an animal that their partner had in mind and to either describe what we felt or thought. Again everyone in the workshop was able to accurately either describe their partner’s animals’ environment/situation or ask specific questions on the animal’s behalf to their humans. Everyone was able to accomplish this with either looking at a picture of the animal or from a very basic physical description of the animal. Diane can be reached at diane@powerpaws.com for more information on classes or for communication sessions. She works not only with pet owners, but also with veterinarians, breeders and trainers.

Kathy Ray, Dr. Ruth Roberts and Kirstin Steele listening to what another attendee experienced during their communication session with an animal.

Kathy Ray, Dr. Ruth Roberts and Kirstin Steele listening to what another attendee experienced during their communication session with an animal.

 

Kathy Ray and Flossy Brock reading each other.

Kathy Ray and Flossy Brock reading each other.

For the second portion of the workshop, Marti Chitwood gave a presentation on gut health being the link to overall health & well being. She discussed the addictive nature of Glutens from grains and casein from dairy products. She also discussed Biofilm, a mucopolysacharide film laid down by bacteria in the gut, middle ear, and other openings to the outside from the body. Biofilm allows bacteria, viruses and yeast to stick tightly and continue to make a person feel ill. The Biofilm also makes it difficult to get rid of the bugs that don’t belong, as it forms a protective layer. Marti discussed how to gradually change your diet to make a less hospitable environment for the bad bugs, as well as a protocol to help get rid of the biofilm and the bad bugs that inhabit it. Her recommended to minimize or avoid the following: Wheat, barley, oats and rye; dairy/milk; nightshade vegetables like tomatoes and eggplant; corn; soy; coffee; alcohol; soda; sugar; juices; citrus and bananas. Marti recommends the following every day: drinking 1 to 2 liters of clean alkaline water; adding either lemon juice or apple cider vinegar to your water; 6 servings of low starch vegetables; lean organic protein around mid-day; soaked raw nuts; seaweed; green tea or herbal tea; olive, flax or nut oil; a light supper of vegetables and small servings of starch and eating smaller portions of food away from meals.

Bella Chitwood enjoying some carrots during the human nutrition lecture.

Bella Chitwood enjoying some carrots during the human nutrition lecture.

 

Reading the Crock Pot recipe

Reading the Crock Pot recipe

Dr. Ruth Roberts conducted a lively discussion addressing whether we need to vaccinate our pets every year or not. The details of her discussion can be found in the latest Lowcountry Dog Magazine issue.The most important message from this was to talk to your veterinarian about what are the best options for your pet. There are 3 year rabies vaccines available which are approved by DHEC, AAHA and AAFP. Only core vaccines should be given on a regular schedule. These include for dogs: Rabies (every three years) and DHPP (every three to five years). Kennel Cough or Bordatella, Leptospirosis and Lyme are non core vaccines and should only be given if the animal is in a high risk area for the disease. SO if you board or groom your pet…they should get kennel Cough or Bordatella every year. For cats: core vaccines include Rabies (every three years), FVRCP (which includes Panleukopenia, Herpes virus and Calicivirus…every three years). Non core feline vaccines include Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus ( and should be given only if the cat is at risk for these diseases). So if your cat is an indoor/outdoor cat and is in contact with other cats whose vaccine history is questionable…then you should get your cat vaccinated.

Chef Renata explaining the benefits of dry mustard in the Crock Pot recipe for pets

Chef Renata explaining the benefits of dry mustard in the Crock Pot recipe for pets

 

Dr. Ruth discussing the different energetics of food and the benefits of healthy food for your animals.

Dr. Ruth discussing the different energetics of food and the benefits of healthy food for your animals.

The day was rounded off with Chef Renata Dos Santos, of My Personal Chef, demonstrating how easy it is to cook for your pets. Each animal’s needs are different and ideally you should consult an Animal Food Therapist about which ingredients is best suited for your pet. The following is a recipe for a healthy dog or cat:
16 oz Turkey 
16 oz white fish fish ( cod, whiting, or tilapia) or Pork 
16 oz ground beef 
4 tbs Extra virgin Olive oil 
3 cups total spinach, collard greens, or kale (Any type green ok to use 1 at a time or mix up) 
1 Can Kidney Beans 
1.5 cup carrots or Sweet potatoes 
1/2 tsp dried Turmeric 
1/2 tsp dried mustard 
1 clove uncooked garlic 
7.5 tums 250mg tablets 
6000 mg taurine for cats 
Throw it all together in the crock pot, add 2 cups water, and let cook for 8 hours, then add 1 cup barley – Mix up cooked food with a potato masher, then add the Barley, and mix again. Let steam up for an additional hour, then turn off crock pot, and let cool. To fill crock pot, use approximately 40% protein, 25% carbohydrates, and 35% vegetables by volume in crock-pot. Always add 2.5 tums per pound of meat. To fill crock pot, use approximately 40% protein, 25% carbohydrates, and 35% vegetables by volume in crock- pot. Always add 2.5 tums per pound of meat. To take the chill off the food, add some warm water, or just put the kettle up to boil when you start making the 
food. Mix in any herbs you may be giving with the warm water & food. If your pet is heavy, start low. If your pet is thin and active, go medium to high, and adjust based on how the pet responds. Always change food gradually, mixing in 50% old food With 50% new food, and phasing out the old food over 1 to 2 weeks. 

For more information on any of the above, please contact Sun Dog Cat Moon Veterinary Clinic at 843-437-0063 or at info@sundogcatmoon.com

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One response to “Healthy Pets and People Seminar Recap

  1. I started my dogs on the Sun Dog Cat Moon crock pot diet a few months ago, and the changes have been amazing. My 2-year-old Bluetick, who never cared much about food and could go days without eating, now jumps around in circles and gobbles up her food in seconds. My heavier year-old Black & Tan has slimmed down considerably and has a ton more energy. Both dogs have the shiniest, healthiest coat, no more dry skin, and are just beautiful due to their new diet! I highly recommend talking with Dr. Ruth about what diet is right for your pet!

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